Watch These 5 Films This Winter Break

1. Kill it and leave this town

2. Assassins

The audacious murder of the brother of North Korea’s Supreme Leader Kim Jon Un in a crowded Malaysian airport sparked a worldwide media frenzy. At the center of the investigation are two young women who are either cold-blooded killers or unwitting pawns in a political assassination. ASSASSINS goes beyond the headlines to question every angle of this case, from human trafficking to geo-political espionage to the secretive dynamics of the North Korean dynasty.

“Ryan White’s fascinating documentary chronicles plays like a political thriller with tragic consequences for the two women at its center.” Matt Goldberg, Collider

“It’s a Kafka-esque and sometimes darkly comic tale of deception and exploitation that makes for a smartly assembled and eminently topical film that arrives at a crucial juncture in world affairs…” Justin Lowe, The Hollywood Reporter

Watch here: https://watch.eventive.org/assassins/play/5fce762c3257c21303cc2c3b

3. MAYOR

MAYOR is a real-life political saga following Musa Hadid, the Christian mayor of Ramallah, during his second term in office. His immediate goals: repave the sidewalks, attract more tourism, and plan the city’s Christmas celebrations. His ultimate mission: to end the occupation of Palestine. Rich with detailed observation and a surprising amount of humor, MAYOR offers a portrait of dignity amidst the madness and absurdity of endless occupation while posing a question: how do you run a city when you don’t have a country?

4. Soul

On Disney plus … perfect for a family night.

5. Another Round

Best Movies I Watched in 2020

5. Lawrence of Arabia

Come on, you haven’t watched it yet?!

Well, me, I was avoiding it intentionally for years because I don’t want to feel angry. But I had to finally face the ultimate betrayal of Arabs by Great Britain during the The Great Arab Revolt.

The film is an epic, with Anthony Queen, Noor AlShareef, and a conglomerate of Hollywood’s best actors and film makers. Lawrence is a special personality who is more Arab than half of the arabs today in the Arab World. To see a glimpse of his story done right is great.

Off course, historically speaking, he had a less important role that it is shown here, and King Faisal had a much more important role that displayed here. Also, there were many arab heros who were ignored for the purpose of highlighting Lawrence in this film.

Over all it is a great film, and must be seen by at least every Arab.

4. The Climb

What a dark comedy … the intricacies and frustrations of imperfect friendships .. the vulnerabilities of men .. the subtle challenges of life that hurt slowly .. this will leave you happy and sad.

3. My King (Ma Roi)

Abuse and love … this film struggles in the problematic space between them. Science says that what a woman wants and what a woman thinks she wants are two different things. Sometimes they are opposite. Sometimes what we love in a person is also what makes him eventually a monster, the devours us. Epic performance … and if you love Paris, this is so parisian.

2. Joshy (2016)

This is the best American film of this year, and it is so independent and simple, that puts the multi million productions to shame. Another mastered dark comedy that you will relate to. A weekend to make Joshy happy turns into a self discovery for everyone, and a salad of different personality types. Awkward moments weave these scenes … an orchestra with 10 conductors, and no players.

1. Another Round (2020)

This is the guy of THE HUNT. The Hunt is one of the best films I have seen in my life, and this one turns into another Hunt, and makes it to the same list.

I don’t know how Danish or Swedish people think, but definitely they are years ahead in the understanding of the human situation. This shows up in their films, and this film is an epic display of Scandinavian realism.

The theme is about drinking in Western society, but behind the lines and scenes there are much deeper existential themes… so watch carefully and look into the eyes of the actors.

Film Review: Fire at Sea


Each shot can stand alone as a work of photographic art. It is a documentary film from a third person omnicious point of view. 

The sea here plays a big part of the theme. It is the canvas. It is the life and death. It is the silence. It is the observer and the actor. 

There is no more real encounter of the Mediterranean  refugee crisis of our time better and more vivid than this film. 

True work of Art depicting the true scary face of our vulnerabilities and decaying innocence of our humanity. 

Cicely … the calming sea … the apathetic waves … the simplicity of the island inhabitants, the innocence of childhood … the serenity of boredom … the beauty of Italian traditional music … the peace of family … contrasted with what these waves brings of human suffering ashore. 

Must see. Must present. Must act to end suffering of our species. 

A Hard Day … Korean Movie

I watched this movie last night with couple of my friends at the Detroit Film Theater.

The movie is full of action and suspense, taking one twist after the other from the beginning few seconds. Amazing film making and interesting camera works at times. It is also a nice window to the Korean culture: how they respect their elders, mourning, loyalty, and female/male relarionship. It also exposes corruption within the government or police departments.
There are many funny moments, and although violence is part of the plot, there are no graphic violence scenes save a fight scene that gets really long 😀.
I recommend this as an action movie with light ending.

Here is what DFT said:

(South Korea/2014—directed by Kim Seong-hun)
A homicide detective makes the first of several bad decisions when, immediately after his mother’s funeral, he runs somebody over and decides to hide the victim’s body in a most inappropriate location. To his horror, he soon discovers that a colleague is making steady progress on the case, and to make matters worse, there seems to be a witness – another detective. This nerve-wracking thriller is all non-stop surprises and suspense, with a thread of dark comedy at every turn. If you’re looking for profundity you won’t find it here, but for those who crave an occasional jolt of supremely kinetic, only-in-the-movies mayhem, this South Korean surprise delivers the goods. 2014 Cannes Film Festival, Director’s Fortnight selection. In Korean with English subtitles. (111 min.)
“When was the last time you saw a modern thriller with so much narrative and visual wit that you were simultaneously laughing and crying out in fear? Dare to be disoriented.” –David Edelstein, New York Magazine

“You’ll be glad that A Hard Day isn’t happening to you, but you won’t regret observing it all from a safe distance.” –Michael O’Sullivan, The Washington Post

“It’s the heady black humor, social satire and a touch of surrealism that keeps audiences on the edge of their seats.” –Maggie Lee, Variety
– See more at: http://www.dia.org/mobile/calendar/event.aspx?id=5226&iid=6347#.dpuf